Чувствовать

Why do we use this case here? And this verb? What rule should I use here?
User avatar
Mashenka
Master user
Master user
Posts: 68
Joined: Dec 11th, 18, 07:57
Mother tongue: English
Country: USA

Чувствовать

Postby Mashenka » Dec 31st, 18, 06:21

Which case follows чувствовать? I have seen it followed by accusative, instrumental, and I think nominative. Is it correct to say, Я чувствую плохо? Я чувствую виноватой? Чувствуйте себя как дома. Thanks in advance

User avatar
Jeremy Katz
Master user
Master user
Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 10th, 17, 18:19
Mother tongue: Russian
Country: Russia
Contact:

Re: Чувствовать

Postby Jeremy Katz » Jan 18th, 19, 15:13

First two examples are good case-wise, but there's a mistake. You see, when we use an adjective or an adverb we add a reflective pronoun, BUT in case with this particular word we need only "себя", as in "(my/one/him-self). Else, as with a noun, it's not needed ("I feel the warmth" - "Я чувствую тепло"). NOTE: "I feel you" - "Я чувствую тебя (Вас)", in it's direct meaning, not as a colloquialism.
Third one is on point 100%. Can't really explain it atm, it's a syntax matter.
One too many advertisements on this site already. None here for a change.

User avatar
Mashenka
Master user
Master user
Posts: 68
Joined: Dec 11th, 18, 07:57
Mother tongue: English
Country: USA

Re: Чувствовать

Postby Mashenka » Jan 21st, 19, 13:42

I see the 3rd example alot, but I never understood the case part of it either

User avatar
Jeremy Katz
Master user
Master user
Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 10th, 17, 18:19
Mother tongue: Russian
Country: Russia
Contact:

Re: Чувствовать

Postby Jeremy Katz » Jan 22nd, 19, 12:37

Mashenka wrote:I see the 3rd example alot, but I never understood the case part of it either


"Чувствуйте себя, как дома" is a complex sentence. In Russian, the pretense "как" signifies a comparative structure (As if it would translate not as "feel yourself at home", but as "feel yourself as if you were at home"). And this comparative structure is 1. separated by a comma and 2. follows it's own grammar and case rules. Basically, "себя" relates to "чувствуйте" (which we're already established as an accusative case), "как" doesn't change (how would you change the word "how") and then "дома" relates to "как", an accusative case, as it asks "how" (cases may vary actually, it's deeper than that).
One too many advertisements on this site already. None here for a change.

User avatar
Mashenka
Master user
Master user
Posts: 68
Joined: Dec 11th, 18, 07:57
Mother tongue: English
Country: USA

Re: Чувствовать

Postby Mashenka » Jan 23rd, 19, 02:54

It sounds like, " make yourself at home," might be the Ebglish equivalent.

Or in Spanish, "Mi casa es su casa."

I think sometimes equivalents don't translate so literally

What is confusing to me is; " чувствовать виноватой." I have tried finding a grammatical explanation for this but can't find one (чувствовать + instrumental). It makes sense on a visceral level. I would like to see this confirmed in a grammar book because I would feel more confident using the instrumental case after чувстовать.

User avatar
Jeremy Katz
Master user
Master user
Posts: 50
Joined: Apr 10th, 17, 18:19
Mother tongue: Russian
Country: Russia
Contact:

Re: Чувствовать

Postby Jeremy Katz » Jan 23rd, 19, 17:55

Mashenka wrote:It sounds like, " make yourself at home," might be the Ebglish equivalent.

Or in Spanish, "Mi casa es su casa."

I think sometimes equivalents don't translate so literally

What is confusing to me is; " чувствовать виноватой." I have tried finding a grammatical explanation for this but can't find one (чувствовать + instrumental). It makes sense on a visceral level. I would like to see this confirmed in a grammar book because I would feel more confident using the instrumental case after чувстовать.


Yeah, it means the same, though not as literal.

As I said, adjectives while being used here need a reflexive pronoun "себя". "Чувствовать себя виноватой (-ым, if masculine or neutral)
I think you can only find it in context, not as a grammar rule or anything of sort
https://ww w. online-translator .com/Samples/ru-en/%D1%87%D1%83%D0%B2%D1%81%D1%82%D0%B2%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%B0%D1%82%D1%8C
This should probably do it. Remove the spaces
One too many advertisements on this site already. None here for a change.


Return to “Russian grammar”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests