Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

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Masha
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Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Masha » Aug 14th, 18, 06:29

Can we start an English to Russian and Russian to English idiom exchange? It would be a lot of fun.

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Masha » Aug 17th, 18, 04:56

Would, " Мне надоело," be equivalent to "I'm fed up?"

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Jeremy Katz » Sep 26th, 18, 15:29

Not quite. More like "I'm done with this".
However, "I'm fed up" does have an equivalent, and that would be "Я сыт по горло [существительное в творительном падеже (with something)]".
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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Mashenka » Dec 11th, 18, 08:01

Thanks for the reply. Might one of those also mean, "I've had it up to here?"

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Jeremy Katz » Dec 13th, 18, 01:54

Mashenka wrote:Thanks for the reply. Might one of those also mean, "I've had it up to here?"


Indeed, second one. "I've had it up with *something or someone*"
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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Mashenka » Dec 15th, 18, 04:18

So. Я сыта по горло с скучной работой или работою. The reason I ask is that I've seen both from some credible Russian learning sites. Also, do you need the "с " with it.

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Mashenka » Dec 15th, 18, 04:57

I understand now why it's по горло, because по is being used with горло in the accusative case. But I also wanted to confirm that the rest is in the instrumental case.

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Jeremy Katz » Dec 15th, 18, 19:07

Mashenka wrote:So. Я сыта по горло с скучной работой или работою. The reason I ask is that I've seen both from some credible Russian learning sites. Also, do you need the "с " with it.


I would've put it like this: Я сыт по горло этой скучной работой. No preposition required. More examples; "Я сыт по горло твоим нытьём".
The latter would be an older spelling. I wouldn't recommend using it, because it's quite easy to mistake it for a 1-st person present time for "to work". Only one letter difference. Plus, it sounds kinda off when you hear it.

And, for the case, that would be instrumental indeed.
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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Mashenka » Dec 16th, 18, 07:24

How about, "ёлки палки?"

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Re: Idioms Russian to English, English to Russian

Postby Jeremy Katz » Dec 16th, 18, 14:30

Mashenka wrote:How about, "ёлки палки?"


That's not an idiom in it's essense, but a exclamation, like "What in tarnation!", quite literally that would mean "firs and sticks!".
And might I add, since this is an exclamation, the words don't relate to one another, moreover, it's written with a dash "ёлки-палки", or even "ёлки-иголки" sometimes (as might be seen in Smeshariki (Kikoriki, as they're known in the US), also a recommended series, though a cartoon), which means "firs and needles". The latter rhymes, [yo'lki - igo'lki].
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