Russian Grammar Question

Why do we use this case here? And this verb? What rule should I use here?
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elatoeshka
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Russian Grammar Question

Postby elatoeshka » Sep 11th, 15, 04:21

Hi, I would like to know more about Russian Grammar on using it. My questions are , When you use feminine case or Masculine case , does this mean that any gender can say it but the cases only goes to only words that are feminine and masculine? Another question of mine is when you are saying Russian sentences in person or writing, would you only stick to a certain case after you made one or depending on what your saying you would change the case again? Thank you.

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RJenhady
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Russian Grammar Question

Postby RJenhady » Sep 25th, 16, 13:30

Hi Will it be a correct grammar construction to use the verb ban like this:
The decision was to ban him from doing <such and such>

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Sergeich
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Re: Russian Grammar Question

Postby Sergeich » Dec 10th, 16, 04:34

When you use feminine case or Masculine case , does this mean that any gender can say it but the cases only goes to only words that are feminine and masculine? Another question of mine is when you are saying Russian sentences in person or writing, would you only stick to a certain case after you made one or depending on what your saying you would change the case again?
There is some confusion about terms gender(род) and case(падеж), so it's hard for me to understand that you exactly meant.
All Russian nouns are divided into three groups: masculine gender nouns, feminine gender nouns and neuter gender nouns. Each noun has a certain gender and it can't be changed depending on context.

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Bentjudges
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Russian Grammar Question

Postby Bentjudges » Oct 15th, 17, 20:06

Hello
I would like to translate dutch grammar to russian from English
I ve just begun studiing dutch and I need that extra information. I can easС€ly get it in english but I really want to try to translate it. May I?
My website https://wonder-glass.ca/

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site2017
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Re: Russian Grammar Question

Postby site2017 » Nov 1st, 17, 00:42

Asking Questions in Russian
1. Fill in the Correct Question Word in Blanks

Where did they see this film?
Where did they see that movie?
How did they do it?
How did they do that?
Why did we turn to such a doctor?
Why did we go to such a doctor?
Where do you live?
Where do you live?
When do you want to practice?
When do you want to study?


Build site

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ali.rafami
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Re: Russian Grammar Question

Postby ali.rafami » Jan 29th, 18, 20:09

How can I say "you are living in function of it" in russian language ? I use the translator but I think it is wrong, look: "Вы живете в зависимости от него".
عمل بینی
I try to research the phrase at google but seems that it phrase isn't used.

I am new in languages, so I need a help, what russian grammar book or website do you recommend?

جراحی بینی

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Nusya
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Re: Russian Grammar Question

Postby Nusya » Jun 29th, 18, 19:46

site2017
it is not clear what your question is about.

ali.rafami
Could you put this phrase in a piece of text? That is, what are we talking about? The translation often depends on this.
my native language is Russian
my English is bad, sorry ))

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Masha
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Re: Russian Grammar Question

Postby Masha » Aug 14th, 18, 05:56

Sergeich is correct. All Russian nouns have genders, masculine, feminine, or neuter and their corresponding plural forms. Adjectives must agree in gender with the nouns being described. There are six Russian cases, (although some would say there are a few more, but in general, usually six cases are studied). They are: nominative, accusative, prepositional, dative, genitive, and instrumental. Knowing when to use each case takes a long time to learn. The grammar section in this forum is a good resource for learning about cases. Hope this helps. Cases are for grammar usage. Nominative, as the word suggests means the noun in its main form or if you will, the name of the noun. Accusative is used for a noun that is the direct object. Dative is used for a noun that is the indirect object. Prepositional indicates where. Genitive indicates possession. Instrumental is with whom, or how something is being done. This description is just the tip of the iceberg. Many grammar books are written about cases.


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